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are wounded. i'm katie couric. it happened at a medical facility where soldiers are screened before deployment. >> we needed to seek shelter immediately, close and lock our doors and windows. at that point, we didn't know that there had been some mass shooting. >> couric: the entire base was locked down, and two additional arrests were made. this tragedy plays out amid growing concern about violence on military bases as america fights two wars. >> it's difficult enough when we lose these brave americans in battles overseas. it is horrifying that they should come under fire at an army base on american soil. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: and good evening, everyone. it is the last place you'd expect american soldiers to come under attack-- their own military base-- but that's what happened today at fort hood in kileen, texas, midway between austin and waco. it is america's largest military base. today, according to the army, an officer opened fire inside a soldier readiness center, a facility where military personnel are prosed before a
men and women who lost their lives. >> that family lost their gem. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, the fort hood suspect. scene wearing a muslim prayer robe hours before the massacre. new details about his opposition to america's wars and what could have motivated them to attack his fellow soldiers. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. he's an army psychiatrist deeply opposed to america's wars and now accused of committing one of the worst attacks ever at a military base on u.s. soil. tonight, we're learning more about major nidal mailk hasan who authorities say opened fire on fellow soldiers at fort hood in killeen, texas, yesterday. this was a day of mourning at the base where 12 soldiers and one civilian were killed in the massacre at a soldier readiness center. some were about to deploy overseas, others had just returned home. authorities now say 34 people were wounded, including hasan, who was initially counted among the dead. he's in critical but stable condition and has been moved to the bro
wow. >> that's it for us on 9 news now at 6:00. and the "cbs evening news" with katie couric is next. >>> and don't forget, wusatv9.com is always on. have a great night. >> couric: tonight, important health news affecting millions of americans. a government panel says most women under 50 no longer need to be screened for breast cancer. and new concerns about two of the most popular cholesterol will have lowering drugs. i'm katie couric. also tonight mr. who? tear down that firewall. president obama challenges china's government to allow unfettered access to the internet. sarah palin back on the trail, this time selling a book. and he version of the 2008 presidential campaign. and what has steve hartmann gotten himself into now? >> good lord! you are kidding me! >> couric: wait until you see tonight's "assignment america." captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. snipe and good evening, everyone. we're beginning with a story that will affect millions of american women. government health experts made a major change today in the guidelines fo
." captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. snipe and good evening, everyone. we're beginning with a story that will affect millions of american women. government health experts made a major change today in the guidelines for breast cancer screening. with nearly 200,000 women in this country expected to be diagnosed this year and more than 40,000 expected to die from it, early detection has long been emphasized as a way to save lives. and over a recent two-year period, 64% of women in their 40s got a mammogram. 40 has been the age women were told to start getting screened, but now the experts say most women should wait until they're 50. dr. jennifer ashton is with us tonight. jennifer, that is major shift in what we've been told for years. >> reporter: that's right, katie. these new guidelines challenge long-standing guidelines for detecting breast cancer. they come from a respected panel of government medical expert which is regularly makes recommendations on how to prevent disease. >> no, don't jump! don't jump! >> reporter: 42-year-old jessica mos
evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: and good evening, everyone. we begin tonight with a story sure to affect millions of american families: the biggest recall of baby cribs in u.s. history. more than two million cribs with drop-downsides made by the kay canadian company stork craft. the consumer product safety commission says the defect in these cribs is linked to four deaths and over the past decade this type of crib has been blamed for dozens of deaths. our the "early show" consumer reporter susan koeppen has details. >> reporter: michelle it witte thought her son tyler was safely tucked into his crib but when she went back to check on him... >> i immediately fell to my knees and started screaming. >> reporter: the crib she considered to be tyler's safe haven had turned out to be a death trap. he has been sleeping in a crib with the drop-down side. somehow his head got stuck in a gap between the side rail and head board. >> to see the horrific sight of him strangled between the head board and side rail of his crib was just horrifying to me. >> reporter: according to the consumer
not the way to end things on a friday. >> have a good weekend. cbs evening news with katie couric is next. have a good night. couric: tonight, for the second time this week, a major change in guidelines for cancer screening. this time, it's o.b./g.y.n. saying most women should get pap smears less frequently. i'm katie couric. also tonight, fewer states are reporting major outbreaks of the h1n1 flu. but with the holiday travel season coming up, there's growing concern the virus will spread. what's going on at this company? 26 employees have committed suicide in the past two years. and the queen of daytime television giving up her throne. >> 25 years feels right in my bones, and it feels right in my spirit. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: and geographic, everyone. this week is ending as it began-- with a big change in cancer screening guidelines for women. first we got the controversial recommendations about breast cancer and mammograms, and today it was serve cancer. the nation's obstetricians and gynecologists are now saying
of it than we knew. meanwhile, the british may have a better system for fighting that flu. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the president tells his war planners "go back to the drawing board." he's not happy with their proposals for afghanistan and asks for more options-- meaning further delay. what's left of ida batters the east coast, knocking out power to tens of thousands. and surfing on the job. while some employers are cracking down, others say it's the new way to do business. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: and good evening, everyone. it's a lot more widespread than they thought. federal health officials today put out new number for the h1n1 flu. they showed 22 million americans have come down with it so far, and nearly 4,000 have died, including 540 chirp. but the officials say the higher numbers do not mean the epidemic is getting worse, we're just getting a much more accurate count. here's dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: today's numbers are about four times higher than what the c.d.c. reported just six days ago. >> oh, i know! >
this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: and good evening, everyone. it's a lot more widespread than they thought. federal health officials today put out new number for the h1n1 flu. they showed 22 million americans have come down with it so far, and nearly 4,000 have died, including 540 chirp. but the officials say the higher numbers do not mean the epidemic is getting worse, we're just getting a much more accurate count. here's dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: today's numbers are about four times higher than what the c.d.c. reported just six days ago. >> oh, i know! >> our estimates, we believe, give us a better estimate of how much disease, hospitalization, and death there is. >> reporter: the government now believes roughly eight million children have come down with the virus. in addition to the 540 who have died, 36,000 have been hospitalized. among adults 18 to 64, there were an estimated 12 million cases. 53,000 hospitalizations and almost 3,000 deaths. >> what we are seeing in 2009 is unprecedented. >> reporter: but the agency insists the outbreak hasn't actu
, the scene of tragedy last week, scenes of joy as soldiers from iraq come home. i'm katie couric. also tonight, he left an extensive electronic paper trail. investigators follow the writings of fort hood shooting suspect major nidal malik hasan. and can a donation by legislation? >> trying to match up legislation like that is erroneous. you shouldn't do that, sharyl? >> reporter: we'll follow the congressman and the money. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for the first time as problem led the nation in observing veterans day, honoring the men and women who have risked their lives and, in many cases, given their lives for their country. and there was another first today, not just for this president but any president. after placing a wreath at the tomb of the unknowns at arlington national cemetery-- as so many of his predecessors have done-- the president went where no commander-in-chief had laid foot before: section 60 at arlington where veterans of iraq and afghanistan-- the war he now leads-- are laid to
for you. i'm katie couric. also tonight, an air traffic nightmare. a computer glitch in salt lake city leaves travelers stranded at airports all over the country. the government says united airlines and other big companies dumped their pension responsibilities on taxpayers, even as executives got huge retirement packages. and the must-have, can't-find toy of the holiday season. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: and good evening, everyone. it's down now to two health care reform bills, the one the house passed two weeks ago and the one senate majority leader harry reid put out today, the first test vote will happen on saturday. reid hasn't locked up the 60 votes he needs to get it through. his bill would extend coverage to 94% of americans, the house bill, 96%. nancy cordes tells us the major difference-- cost. ( applause ). >> reporter: exuberant senate democrats hailed their long-awaited final health care bill today. like the house bill, this senate version would impose an immediate ban on insurance industry abuses, such as drop
6:00. the cbs evening news with katie couric is next. we'll see you at 7:00. wusa9.com is always out. >> couric: tonight, the road to recovery. after four years in the red, ford drives its way back to profitability. i'm katie couric. also tonight, new data confirms, children need two shots of the h1n1 vaccine. and latest test results show the vaccine is safe and effective for pregnant women. return to ground zero. a salute to the navy's newest warship built with world trade center steel. plus... >> fire in the hole! >> couric: steve hartman risks his hering in tonight's "assignment america". >> you may want to hold your ears. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's the kind of news we've waited a long time to hear. two industries hit hard by the recession are finally showing signs of rebounding. today the government reported construction spending rose by .8% in september, powered by the largest jump in home building in more than six years. and ford has made a u-turn, announcing today that it earned a th
captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's the kind of news we've waited a long time to hear. two industries hit hard by the recession are finally showing signs of rebounding. today the government reported construction spending rose by .8% in september, powered by the largest jump in home building in more than six years. and ford has made a u-turn, announcing today that it earned a third quarter profit of nearly a billion dollars. national correspondent dean reynolds reports on a rare occurrence of late: a detroit success story. >> reporter: it's been 51 months since ford last made money selling cars in this country, so today's numbers were reason for company executives to crow a little. >> consumers are really seeing the value in our products and we're seeing that in our revenue. >> reporter: ford, which avoided the bankruptcy that befell chrysler and g.m. gained market share and made money around the globe. $357 million in north america, $247 million in south america, $193 million in europe, and $27 m
, what have investigators turned up so far? >> reporter: well, katie, law enforcement tells cbs news that after going through all their files on known or suspected terrorists, they have found nothing to change their belief major nidal malik hasan acted alone. investigators have now begun tracking how major hasan lived and what he did with his money. he was a psychiatrist in the army medical corps with no family to support yet he was living like a private. according to army pay charts, a major with hasan's time in service would make $92,000 a year in base pay and allowances. as a psychiatrist, he would have earned specialty pay on top of that. yet he lived in a $350 a month apartment even though he received $1,100 a month in housing allowance. judging by the things hasan gave away shortly before his rampage, he had few worldly possessions. one possible explanation? members of a mosque where he worshipped said he was a very generous man who helped others pay their utility bills. outside the mosque, he seemed to live in cyberspace. law enforcement sources say he was a prolific communica
for more victims. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the problems monitoring and tracking sex offenders. across the country, many in law enforcement warn the system is failing. with the h1n1 vaccine so scarce, how did this clinic dallas get thousands of doses? plus, they made fun of him because he's different. >> reporter: how does that make you feel? >> really sad. real sad. >> couric: now he's out to stop bullies everywhere and he's tonight's "american spirit." >> yes! captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. we begin tonight in cleveland where a mass murder case is getting more gruesome by the day. a home on imperial avenue on the city's east side has become a massive crime scene. some veteran detectivs say it's the worst they have ever seen. the remains of 11 women were discovered there over the past few days, some may have been there for years. today, police said they may start tearing down the walls to search for even more victims. randall pinkston is in cleveland with more on the investigation and the suspect
on trial in civilian court just blocks from ground zero. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the alleged fort hood gunman could be facing the death penalty. and his lawyer says major nidal malik hasan may be paralyzed from the waste down. a eureka moment-- nasa says there's water on the moon and lots of it. and on the waterfront-- a triumph of the american spirit. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> and good evening, everyone. a new administration, a new and different plan for bringing alleged terrorists to justice. attorney general eric holder announced today the man who admits he planned the 9/11 attackes that killed nearly 3,000 people, khalid sheikh mohammed, will be tried not by the military but by a federal civilian court. and the government will almost certainly seek the death penalty. president obama traveling in asia today said mohamed will be subject to the most exacting demands of justice. bob orr tells us, mohammed will be tried, along with four accomplices, here in new york city, not far from where the world trade center stood until se
this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. we begin tonight in cleveland where a mass murder case is getting more gruesome by the day. a home on imperial avenue on the city's east side has become a massive crime scene. some veteran detectivs say it's the worst they have ever seen. the remains of 11 women were discovered there over the past few days, some may have been there for years. today, police said they may start tearing down the walls to search for even more victims. randall pinkston is in cleveland with more on the investigation and the suspect's first day in court. >> reporter: 50-year-old convicted sex offender anthony sowell stared straight ahead as he was described by prosecutors as an incredibly dangerous threat to the public. the judge ordered him held without bond on charges of rape, kidnapping, and five counts of murder and that could just be the beginning. police showed up at sowell's door on the east side of cleveland last thursday to investigate an alleged rape. armed with a search warrant, they found 11 dead women, five buried in the bac
" with katie couric. >> and good evening, everyone. a new administration, a new and different plan for bringing alleged terrorists to justice. attorney general eric holder announced today the man who admits he planned the 9/11 attackes that killed nearly 3,000 people, khalid sheikh mohammed, will be tried not by the military but by a federal civilian court. and the government will almost certainly seek the death penalty. president obama traveling in asia today said mohamed will be subject to the most exacting demands of justice. bob orr tells us, mohammed will be tried, along with four accomplices, here in new york city, not far from where the world trade center stood until september 11, 2001. >> reporter: eight years after the most devastating terror attack on american soil, the accused architects of 9/11 will be transferred from military custody at guatanamo bay, where they've been held for years, to a federal lockup in new york and tried in a civilian courthouse just blocks from ground zero. >> i fully expect to direct prosecutors to seek the death penalty against each of the alleged 9/11 co
by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is one of the toughest and most important duties any president faces: comforting the families of america's fallen heroes and the nation that grieves along with them. that's what president obama did today at fort hood where 12 soldiers and one civilian were killed in cold blood, allegedly by another soldier. some 15,000 mourners gathered at this country's largest military base for a memorial service. before it began, the president and mrs. obama met privately with the families of those who died and with some of the 29 wounded. following the service, the obamas visited some of those still in the hospital. national correspondent dean reynolds is at fort hood with more about this day of remembrance. >> reporter: their helmets and boots are are what they left. soldiers slain on american soil, volunteers turned victims. >> as we wrap our arms around the families of our fallen comrades, i would say to you all grieve with us, don't grieve for us. those who have fallen did so in the service of their
at texas. a mass shooting at fort hood. cbs news anchor katie couric fired -- filed this report from moments ago. >> there has been a mass shooting at fort hood, the army basis in killine, texas. one gunman is reportedly in custody. and at least one other is being sought. a local television station is reporting that a s.w.a.t. team is surrounding a building and that a gunman may be holed up inside. it's not known if the victimsie the attackers -- victims or the soldiers were military at this point. fort hood is used for training soldiers before they're deployed to iraq and afghanistan. the entire base is now under lockdown. from the white house, spokesman robert gibbs says president obama has been informed and is monitoring the situation. once again, a mass shooting at fort hood, in texas. at least seven people are dead. 20 others wounded. there's much more ahead on your local news, and of course tonight on the cbs evening news. for now, i'm katie couric, cbs news, new york. >> thank you, katie. of course we'll continue to monitor the situation and bring you any new developments as w
by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> rodriguez: good evening, katie is off tonight. president obama is finally ready to announce his new strategy for the war in afghanistan. it will come next week in an address to the nation. and the question is not whether he'll send more u.s. troops, but how many. by january, 68,000 will be on the ground in afghanistan. and as our david martin first reported earlier this month, the president is expected to approve most of the additional 40,000 troops that have been requested by the commanding general stanley mcchrystal. but that could be a tough sell in congress. chief white house correspondent chip reid begins our coverage tonight. chip? >> reporter: well, good evening, maggie. after a long, agonizing process, the president finally said today he's made a decision on afghanistan. but he also said he's still not ready to tell the american people exactly what that decision is. it took the president nearly two and a half months and nine long meetings with his war council to finally settle on a new plan for afghanistan. >> it is my in
this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is off tonight. our top story begins with a frantic call to 911 made from a car speeding out of control. the gas pedal is stuck, the driver can't stop. it all leads to a deadly crash and now to a massive recall. national correspondent jim axelrod has the story. >> reporter: toyota, which built its reputation on safety and quality, now says it knows how to fix the problem behind the biggest recall in its history. the automaker will redesign accelerator pedals in four million toyotas and lexuses, including the camry-- america's top-selling car, 436,000 sold in 2008-- and the prius, the best-selling hybrid. the trouble is, in toyota vehicles like this 2009 tacoma pickup truck, the gas pedal can get tangled up in the floor mat, causing the vehicle to speed up even if the driver pumps the brakes. it's not enough to stop. five deaths have been blamed on this unintended acceleration and the recall was prompted by a crash outside san diego last summer that killed four family members. >> our accelerator is stuck! >> report
evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening. katie is on assignment. it is election night, and voters across the country are having their say. will the results turn into trends that have national implications? a lot of money and manpower has been spent on several key races. topping that list, gubernatorial contests in virginia, where the republican is favored. and in new jersey, which is expected to be very tight. two special house elections are being held in upstate new york and outside san francisco. washington state is holding a referendum on extending new rights to domestic partners. while in maine, they're voting on whether to overturn the state law that allows same-sex marriages. also, they're electing mayors in six major cities: new york, boston, detroit, pittsburgh, atlanta, and houston. jeff greenfield is our senior political correspondent. jeff, what should we be looking for this evening? >> reporter: harry, predicting national trends from off year elections is like predicting the world series winner from spring training. there are some lessons we might learn fro
. katie? >> couric: dean reynolds at fort hood. dean, thanks very much for that very moving report tonight. while the president mentioned every soldier who died by name, he did not name the fellow soldier who allegedly killed them, major nidal malik hasan, recovering tonight in a military hospital from his wounds. justice correspondent bob orr has the latest on the investigation of hasan and his ties to an anti-american cleric. >> reporter: radical imam anwar al-awlaki has been on the radar of u.s. intelligence for nearly a decade. so the joint terrorism task force snapped to attention last december with intercepted messages between al-awlaki and a u.s. army officer. officials say over six months, major nidal malik hasan traded ten to 20 messages with the controversial cleric who has ties to al qaeda and the 9/11 hijackers. but officials deemed the communications benign and the f.b.i. concluded hasan presented no imminent threat. nothing suggested violence or an incitement to violence, one senior official said. "we didn't have enough for a preliminary investigation." in a review of hasan's
an emotional response to criticism of his past drug use and spoke to katie couric about his book in which he admits uses countrital meth back this 1987. katie asked him about criticism from martina. >> she said not as much shock that did he it as shock he lied about it and didn't own up to it. he's up there with roger chemical ens as far as i'm concerned. he owned up to it in the book but it doesn't help now. >> quau >> yeah. that's what you don't want to hear, but when somebody takes a performance inhibitor, a recreational drug -- >> versus a performance enhancing drug. >> -- the one thing that i would hope is that there are rules that have to be followed but along with that would come compassion that maybe this person doesn't need condemnation, maybe this person could sap a little help. because i was at a time in my life when i immediated help. >> you can watch katie's entire interview on 60 minutes oig this sunday at 7:00. 6:00 central. debbye debbye? >> all right. coming up, oprah winfrey's daytime drama. why she might be headed in a new direction. we'll be right bac
, phillip garrido abduct and raped a young woman named katie callaway 37 he was caught, convicted an accepts tepsed to 50 years in prison, but he was released after just 11 years behind bars. his victim katie callaway hall joins us from las vegas. thank you for taking some time with us. >> good morning. >> i can only imagine your outrage that phillip garrido went unsupervised for so long. what's your reaction to the inspector's report? >> well, to say they dropped the ball is an under statement as far as i'm concerned. there was so many mistakes made all throughout the years. i understand we're talking to california parole board right now, but he's been on parole for almost 21 years. and that first ten 10, 11 year, when he got jaycee, where were those people? they should be held accountable, too. >> and i was going to ask you, in addition to the crimes that he allegedly committed against jaycee dugard, who else should be held accountable for this? >> well, i think the -- like i said, the federal parole board that he was under the jurisdiction of for the first 11 years. i mean, he was three y
the interview with katie couric. >> her book that you're talking about is called "going rogue" and palin describes couric as condescending, biassed and badgering. she said she did not respond well to some of the questions because she was annoyed by couric's constant presence. take a listen. >> my friend opens the curtain for me to get backstage and there's the perky one again with the microphone and the camera is rolling. i'm like dang, give me just a couple of minutes. with all due respect, yeah, nicely. you're pretty perky too. >> a lot of perkiness. cbs's news president says the quality of the interview and the questions speak for themselves there. >> perky one. palin also claims in her book that she was basically tricked into doing the interview in the first place. let's explain that. >> palin says she was driven to do the interview by a campaign adviser named nicole wallace who used to work with couric. she said wallace told her, quote, katie really likes you. she admires you as a working mom and just relates to you. she said katie really needed a career boost and had low self-estee
. >>> plus, an update on the safety of the h1n1 flu vaccine. first, katie couric has a preview of tonight's rbs evening news oig. >>> some of your favorite singers have been use you auto tune that can make anyone sound lying a pop star. so why are some critics so against it? that story tonight on the "cbs evening news." you've got good reasons to eat better. so now 23 campbell's chunky soups have 100% lean meat and a full serving of vegetables. discover a light yogurt like no other. activia light! delicious, fat free, and above all... the only one that has bifidus regularis and is clinically proven to help regulate your digestive system. activia light. ♪ activiaaa! and love from snuggle is also a great value? it's the difference between paying more... and getting more. snuggle fabric softener gives you fresh, snuggly softness your whole family will love and it costs much less than the leading brand. switch to snuggle, and over a year, you'll get more than 2 months of softness for free! more, for less. now that makes all the difference. because everyone loves to snuggle! that make every
is martina navratilova. good morning. >> good morning. >> last night on 60 minutes oig, katie couric read your quote regarding andre agassi's drug use to andre. this is what you said. shocking, not as much shock that he did it as shock that he lied about it and didn't own up to it. he's up there with roger clemens as far as i'm concerned. and i want you to hear andre's reaction after hearing that quote. >> when somebody takes a performance inhibitor, a recreation al drug -- >> versus a performance enhancing drug. p. >> -- the one thing that i would hope is not that there aren't rules that need to be followed, but along with that would come some compassion that maybe this person doesn't need condemnation, maybe this person could stand a little help. >> martina, andre is suggesting that you were not compassionate enough. what do you say now after hearing his response? >> well, let me just say that i am a compassionate person as i've proved it this morning when i rescued a tree frog from my sink and let it in the wild. but you're guilt i don't believe it that recreational drugs should be sta
at the country music awards. >>> first katie you're rick has a preview of tonight's "cbs evening news." >>> american employees spend an hour and a half online during the workday and many of the sites they visit aren't exactly job related. and now businesses are watching. we'll show you how they're cracking down tonight only on the "cbs evening news." ♪ >>> there she is looking beautiful. taylor swift was the big winner of last night's country music award show in nashville, taking home four awards, including entertainer of the year. and this is kind of funny, brad paisley and carrie underwood took a musical shot at conway west who interrupted swift at the mtv music awards show. smoet don't let your babies grow up to be kanye ♪ >> at just 19 years old, taylor swift is the youngest ever named the cma's 13wer takener of the year. >>> former heavy weight boxing champ mike tyson was arrested after a scuffle yesterday at los angeles international airport. tyson was book order suspicion of misdemeanor battery and later released, are as was the paparazzi photographer he scuffled with. both
hundreds of flights to be delayed? first, katie curry hague a preview of tonight's krks evening news oig. >>> the orders were against him until a lawyer gave him a second chance. now in high school senior is thriving on the field and off living a life that once seemed impossible. his remarkable story in the american spirit tonight only on the "cbs evening news." i go down to the pool for a swim... get out and dance... even play a little hide-n-seek. i'm breathing better... with spiriva. announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for both forms of copd... which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. i take it every day. it keeps my airways open... to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, or have vision changes or eye pain. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spir
flu. first, katie couric has a preview of tonight's "cbs evening news." >>> why are big corporate donors giving to this congressman's scholarship foundation that hasn't given out a single scholarship in six years? we'll "follow the money" this week only on the "cbs evening news." . yes, they are. but i don't have time to fly all around town searching for the best price. with the sears research center, we can guarantee you get the lowest price. great, i'll take 4,263. i'm not haulin' 'em. just sayin'. relax. we deliver. with real-time price checks, you get the lowest price guaranteed. this week, get a free sony blu-ray player... when you buy a sony v-series tv. more values. more christmas. that's life. well spent. sears. yeah, so? have you smelled this chair? or these curtains? you've gotta wash this whole room! are you kidding? wash it?! let's wash it with febreze! whoa! [ sniffs ] hey mrs. weber. [ sniffs ] it smells nice in here. i like to keep things fresh. [ male announcer ] for all the things that you can't wash, wash it with febreze. febreze now comes in two fresh new scents
by many new sources asthma jr. ma -- sources as major ma league hasan -- malik hasan nadal. katie couric will have much more on the story and the shootings on the cbs evening news coming up at 6:30. >>> now to another story, we're learning more about the 15-year-old boy suspected of a series of sexual assaults in virginia. ar man doe is live -- armando troy is live with this. >> reporter: those five assaults happened within walking distance at a town home you see behind me. we spend all afternoon speaking to neighbors, classmates of the 50-year-old suspect who two days ago was arrested right here because police belief he was the one assaulting all of these women. classmates of the ninth grader at stone wall jackson high school are in shocked. >> did he ever get in trouble at the school? >> not big things, just little small things. >> like what? >> like little detentions for chewing gum in class and annoying people. that's about it. >> to know he was allegedly arrested for attacking five women? >> that's crazy. >> the the suspect's mother says it's pretty dramatic. >> what was she screami
by an electrical source. >>> katie couric has a preview of the cbs 42 evening news. >>> concerned about health care reform and what the key issues of cost? the public option and changes in medicare will mean for you? we'll have a reality check tonight only on the cbs 42 evening news. >>> and here's a look at tonight's closing numbers from wall street. we'll be right back. >>> another dreary november evening. what is in store for the rest of the week. swj live with first warning complete weather coverage. bob turk is live with the forecast but first bernadette woods with more on what to expect tomorrow. >> tomorrow is going to be similar to what we're seeing now but the sun will come up. starting out with clouds, fog, drizzle and as we head through the afternoon, a same idea here. not all day being wet but having that damp feel to it and as we head through the evening hours spotty rain and drizzle around and also clouds still hanging low. may be a little bit of fog. for the rest of the five day here's bob. >> looks like some improvement at least. may be some sunshine here on thanksgiving and it warm
with oprah winfrey about her trouble with the press. >> let's talk about the interview with katie couric. >> must we? [ laughter ] >> ok. >> you talk about it in the book, so i assume everything in the book is fair game. >> it is. >> you do say it wasn't your best interview. do you think that was a seminole defining moment for you, that interview? >> did not. neither did the campaign. in fact that is why segment two and three and four and maybe five were scheduled. the campaign said right on, good, you are showing your independence. this is what america needs to see and it was a good interview. i'm thinking if you thought that was a good interview. i don't know what a bad interview was because i knew it wasn't a good interview. bill: by the way, one week from tonight, sarah palin will make her first appearance on the factor. it will be big. check two in a bizarre interview last night. the overexposed carrie prejean met with a rather befuddled larry king who repeated her about a now settled lawsuit. >> so what you are saying is in mediation it was discussed why you were mediating? >> larr
, subway scare, a woman falls on the tracks of and oncoming train. first, katie couric has a review tonight's "cbs evening news." >>> our exclusive investigation continues. even if a rape kit is sent to a crime lab, there's no guarantee it will be tested there. so is this allowing too many rapists to strike again and again? that story and more tonight only on the "cbs evening news." er and you worry your pipes might leak (pipe doctor) ask your doctor about treating with vesicare. (pipe woman) then you could treat yourself to a night out with fewer urges or a day with fewer leaks or a trip with fewer overactive bladder problems. (pipe doctor) once daily vesicare can help control your bladder muscle and is proven to reduce frequent, sudden urges and leaks day and night. if you have certain stomach or glaucoma problems, or trouble emptying your bladder, do not take vesicare. tell your doctor right away if you have a serious allergic reaction, severe abdominal pain, or become constipated for three or more days. vesicare may cause blurred vision so use caution while driving or doing unsafe tasks
muslim cleric. and a possible link to some of the 9/11 hijackers. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama's big decision on afghanistan. david martin with the exclusive details of what the military will be getting to continue the fight against the taliban. a cbs news investigation. why so many rapists in this country are getting away with the crime. and "assignment america." they're ready to start their life together-- 50 years after a lie kept them apart. >> like the time had not past.
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